Create A Great Email Marketing Campaign

I recently had the pleasure of attending a webinar lead by Eric Shanfelt, email marketing guru, and digital marketing specialist. The webinar was hosted by the Local Marketing Institute. They provide frequent webinars about various e-commerce and digital marketing subjects.

Eric shared some valuable information that can often be overlooked when you are trying to coordinate an email campaign. Sometimes we get so caught up in deadlines and clients that we forget about the most important factor in email marketing: the audience itself. Eric gave some insight into what users really want to see.

  • They want short emails
  • All emails should be mobile responsive
  • The information should be relevant and useful to the user

Eric noted that emails should be relatively short with a single CTA (call to action). You don’t want to distract your users with long, intricate copy, too many offers or irrelevant information. A good email is a simple one. In order to have a focused and clear email, there are a few things you should keep in mind first. Eric outlined six main factors that contribute to a great, streamlined email campaign. These are:

Audience, Acquisition, Content, Frequency, Delivery, and Analysis

Let’s discuss what each topic means and the ways in which they, as a whole, can create a great email marketing campaign.

1. Audience: Define Your Audience

Your audience is the first and most important factor in your email campaign. These are the people who open and interact with your messages. In order to send emails that these individuals want to open, you need to be sure you know your audience.

If you work in the field of e-commerce or digital marketing, you may be familiar with the concept of buyer personas. These are fictional representations of your target audience. They are the product of market research and analysis into your customer demographics. Before you create an email campaign, you must consult your buyer personas.

Ask Yourself The Following Questions:

  • What is my audience interested in?
  • What do they want to know?
  • What’s their daily life like?

You want to make sure that the people receiving your email newsletters truly like the content you create for them. Do the market research before-hand and find out the age of your audience, their interests, and daily routine. Once you have a good idea of who you’re sending these emails to, you’ll be able to create custom content, catered to what they like.

2. Acquisition: Build Your Email List

How do I define an audience when I don’t have subscribers? There are many different ways to build your email list. A powerful email campaign coupled with an organized, clean list of subscribers is the recipe for success when it comes to email marketing. You can’t send out a campaign without subscribers. Here are a few ways that you can attract new email subscribers.

How To Build Your Email List

  • Have a prominent signup form on your website. You don’t want potential subscribers scrolling and searching your site to sign up for your list.
  • Ensure you have a prominent signup form on social media. You create and share quality content on your social media channels. Build your email list by letting your followers know where they can get even more great content and insider information on your email list.
  • Leverage POS systems (point of sale systems) You can automate subscriptions to your email list. Simply incorporate it into your POS system. After a purchase, let your users know where they can learn more about you, and stay updated on your products. Create an automated request to subscribe.
  • Have a strong customer feedback system. Gather customer feedback at every opportunity.
  • Train your employees to ask. If you are a business owner, let your employees know that they should always be gathering potential email subscribers for the business. They can ask your customers directly!
  • Use incentives. Give your customers that extra push and give them an immediate reason to sign up for your email list. Let your customers know that they can receive special offers and give them a sample by offering a one time discount to those who sign up. You can use different offers or create a giveaway to get them excited about receiving your emails.

3. Content: Plan Your Content

There is nothing worse than receiving an email that doesn’t make sense, seems out of context or contains information that you don’t find appealing or relevant. Create and share quality content with your subscribers to keep them up to date and in the loop.

Ask Yourself

  • What are you trying to accomplish?
  • What information would your customers find valuable?

Email campaigns are part of your content marketing strategy. You need to carefully plan out what each email will say. Set a positive tone for your email and pick your voice. Are you speaking on behalf of your company, the owner or is the email going to sound more personal?

You can share your current site content in your email campaigns as well. Let your users know about a recent ebook you’ve created or share the latest blog post with them. Make sure that the content you share with your users is relevant, relates to your company and to your users. Here are some tips on how to write good copy for the web.

Another important aspect of content is images. Try to avoid putting all of your written email copy in your email as an image. Images are unreliable and do not always render. Have the core of your email copy in plain text. Use images to supplement your message but make sure that your email is still easy to read and understand without any images.

Pro Tip

Eric Shanfelt mentioned that you should never use canned content. By this, he means that you shouldn’t buy content that is created in mass amounts for your industry. This copy is often general, it is not tailored to your business. Share posts that are about specific aspects of your company and avoid sharing general or bought content. Your users want to feel as though you are writing to them personally. They want the content you share with them to apply to your company and their interests.

4. Frequency: How Often Should I Send An Email?

The consensus on this varies. On one hand, you don’t want to overwhelm your email list by sending too many emails too frequently. Your subscribers are likely to get irritated, annoyed or mark you as spam and abuse. On the other hand, you don’t want to send your emails out so infrequently that users forget they’ve subscribed to your list.

They may wonder why they are receiving an email from your company if they’ve gone months without seeing a notification from you. This is also a reason that many people unsubscribe. So how frequently should you send out your email campaigns?

  • No more than weekly
  • No less than monthly
  • Every other week is optimal

You want to keep your emails short and sweet. In order to do this, you should send them out on a regular basis. Otherwise, you’ll end up cramming too much information into your messages. Keep your emails as simple updates to stay in your subscribers’ minds and avoid giving them too much information all at once.

Welcome Emails

Outside of your regular email campaign, be sure to send out welcome emails to those who are new to your subscriber list. You can include a double opt-in form in this email to ensure that your new subscribers really want to receive your emails.

Thank them for signing up and share the perks or benefits of being on your list. The welcome email should leave them excited and awaiting your next newsletter. You can create a welcome email template and schedule it to send to every new subscriber. Most email service providers allow you to automate this process.

5. Delivery: Help Your Emails Get Opened

When you put effort into your list, audience, and content you want to be sure that your emails actually get opened! This can often be one of the trickiest parts of your email campaign because it relies on getting into your users’ inbox. Avoid spam filters by using a reputable email sender.

Once your email gets into the users’ inbox, you need to give them a reason to click on your message. Use a “from name” that you know they will recognize, generally, this should be the name of your company. However, if your name is used synonymously as part of your brand, you can use your name as the “from name” You can also make the email sound more personal by using your own name and the name of your company. For example: “Karmen Clark, from ElementIQ.”

Similar to your subject line, your preview text gives context and credibility to your email campaign. Give your users incentive to open your email by creating a compelling subject line.

In Summary

  • Use a reputable email sender
  • Make emails mobile responsive
  • Use good from and subject line
  • Leverage preview text

These are the most effective ways of getting a higher open rate. When your email provider sees that your emails are getting opened, you gain credibility as a business and your emails are more likely to be seen as informative, rather than spam.

6. Analysis: What Are The Results Of Your Campaign?

Whether you use your email campaign to drive online sales, provide updates to your subscribers or promote exclusive, in-store offers there should always be a clear goal in mind. In order to improve your campaigns and determine whether or not your emails are achieving your goals, you need to analyze the results of your campaigns.

  • Look at the metrics and adjust
  • Look at any replies to your email and respond to people who write to you.
  • Analyze the ROI. The rate of return is the best way to determine whether or not your email campaign is actually driving sales.

Eric Shanfelt shared a list of statistics at the close of his webinar. These were the general numbers that determine good a good email campaign. You can use these benchmarks as a basic indicator of whether or not your email campaigns are meeting your goals and serving their purpose.

Good Email Benchmarks

  • 20% Unique open rates – If it’s less than this, your subscribers aren’t that interested. How did you build your email list? You may want to clean out your list or change your on-site opt-in process.
  • 2.5% Unique click rate – This is a good click rate. This depends on the nature of your email and your brand it only applies to a direct offer
  • 0.3% Unsubscribe rate = Good
  • 0.02% Abuse report = Anything more than this and your users are thinking “I didn’t sign up for this, it’s spam”
  • 0.45% Hard bounce rate = This is an optimal percentage for hard bounces. Anything more and you should look into cleaning your mailing list.

Note

Clean out your unresponsive emails regularly. Remove subscribers that show no activity over a year. They’re dead weight. When you send to a streamlined list you have a better response rate. Your subscribers are there because they are interested in your products and your company.

Closing Thoughts

Hopefully, the information from this webinar was helpful. Eric Shanfelt holds frequent webinars about various aspects of digital marketing. He is well known in the industry for his success with email marketing and e-commerce. He’s also the Founder and CEO of Local Marketing Institute. If you are interested in staying up to date with our blog posts from ElementIQ, be sure to subscribe or comment below!

Guest Post: How To Get More Students For Your Online Course

In the 21st century, education has become more advanced. You can actually take a course on the other side of the world. Learning is no longer restricted to textbooks and e-learning has taken over. Both students and instructors find online courses appealing. Online studies improve accessibility for those who may not be able to sit in a classroom.

Why Choose Online Learning?

Distant learning gives instructors a greater reach. They make education accessible to those who may not live near a school. Online courses are exceptionally popular, and they are only improving.

Managing an e-learning business is just like running any other type of company. The success of your online course depends on how well the content of it appeals to your target audience.

You need to gain credibility and trust with your clients. You can do this by building a reputable website with good reviews and ratings. Advertising plays a key role in catching their attention. In this post, we will discuss how you can get started in promoting your own e-learning program. We will focus on how you can promote your services online, and attract an audience that is ready to learn.

Start An Email Marketing Campaign

Email marketing is a great way to keep those interested and updated about your online courses. Gather emails from your subscribers. List building is critical to an effective email marketing campaign.

Be sure that your website has a call-to-action. Let users know that if they want to receive more timely updates on your programs and enrollment, they should subscribe to your email list. You cannot send emails to them without their permission. It’s against the law to use purchased email lists.

When your course is ready to go live, you should send an email to your subscribers. It’s because, as per Cognique, 91% individuals check their inbox routinely. And 74% say that they prefer correspondence through emails.

In your emails, highlight what students will learn from your course along with testimonials of successful students that have taken it in the past. People love user reviews.

Likewise, include a call to action (CTA), where you give them the option to register for your course.

Reach More People Over Social Networks With Paid Advertising

Social media has consistently been a stand-out option for promoting any kind of business. You should definitely use social media networks to promote your online course.

You can easily connect with individuals over Pinterest, LinkedIn, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and so forth. Setup accounts for your company/institution if you haven’t already and post valuable content that appeals to your target audience. Include a link to your website in your bio so users can learn more if they are interested.

Share content that would incentivize someone to like or follow your page. The very content you create needs to relate to the audience you are trying to attract – students. Create different content buckets that will frame the kinds of content you share on social networks. This means critical updates about your course offerings, eligibility, enrollment, deadlines, and benefits should all be within the content buckets you create.

Furthermore, given that platforms like Facebook prioritize advertising platforms. It’s obviously a main source of revenue for them and they want you to invest money with the benefit of being able to reach people in a targeted manner. You should target a particular group of individuals who you believe will want to register for your course.

Post Frequent Blog Posts

You may be writing articles habitually for your site, but in order to maximize your business, it is best to post on a regular basis. Create a monthly blog post calendar, with topics and titles that are ready to go.

Write content based on keyword research. Get to know what your leads are searching for when they find your course. Try to answer any questions they might have in your blog posts.

You can also write helpful tips for those who are currently enrolled in your e-learning program, or address questions they have in a Q&A blog post. Include a CTA at the end of your blog post, so that users who are interested in your writing and your program can learn more on your website.

Promote Yourself In Conferences

There are many ways to meet other people in your industry. Mingle with others who are interested in online learning. Try to attend summits, conventions and online events whenever possible. You can make valuable connections at these meetings and promote your company as well.

It is a good idea to bring your business card, pamphlets, and infographics about your business. Distribute this information to the individuals who have expressed an interest in your course. Introduce yourself at conventions, you can exchange knowledge with others hosting online courses.

If you meet people who want to register for your program, use a sign-up app to properly gather and archive those who are interested in learning more.

You can use an amazing tool like LeadDigits which can be downloaded easily and synced with a number of Email Marketing Providers (ESPs).

Get Started

Now that you know the basics about marketing your e-learning program, you can go ahead and get started. Simply follow the above steps and you should have a better idea about how to gather leads and properly market to them.
This is the best way to eventually retain more students in your online courses!

Author:

Clara Decker is the marketing manager at CouponsMonk, a deals, and discounts provider company. She is passionate about money saving, investment, and the finance industry. Clara supports non-profit agencies that provide healthcare solutions to handicapped and disabled individuals.

The Best Kept Secret In Content Marketing

Keyboard and coffee

I recently had the opportunity to attend the Neil Patel Advanced Online Content Marketing Summit, 2017. The summit lasted for three days and featured leaders in the tech industry, including speakers from Hubspot, Marketing Profs, Hello Bar, Axe Wellness, Wishpond, Buzzsumo, KISSmetrics, and many more.

The summit was packed with loads of useful information and tips that you can utilize for the best content marketing strategies.

The one session that stood out to me the most was the livestream with Neil himself. This session kicked off the marketing summit and left viewers excited for what they would learn.

During this livestream, he shared his screen with those in the online summit and demonstrated exactly how he optimizes his content for maximal SEO benefits for search engines. In this post, I will go through his tips step-by-step, so everyone can benefit from his simple yet groundbreaking advice.

Get To Know Neil Patel

Neil Patel began by introducing himself. For those who don’t know, Neil Patel is a highly successful online marketer. He is ranked by Forbes as one of the top 10 online marketing influencers in the world. He has helped many companies grow and improve their online presence.

Neil was attracted to entrepreneurship and consulting at a young age and got his first glimpse into digital marketing when he founded Crazy Egg, a software company. He made Crazy Egg profitable largely through internet marketing techniques. Neil grew his digital empire and has become one of the most important people in the field.

He holds regular summits and seminars, where he shares his own knowledge while giving other speakers the chance to share tips and tricks as well.

What Is Content Marketing?

Content marketing is a powerful means of connecting and communicating with your target audience. In short, it is a type of marketing that requires the creation and sharing of content and new information.

Content marketing uses the right words to attract leads, inform interested buyers and convert them. Content marketing can take many different forms and can range from copywriting, email marketing, social media marketing and creating web page content. Content marketing is used at all stages of the inbound marketing funnel.

Neil Patel is a respected and renowned inbound marketing master. He uses content marketing to successfully drive interest in his brands and eventually convert leads. He offers some of the best content marketing advice.

Content Marketing: A Genius At Work

Neil demonstrated a very brief glimpse into his thought process when he creates content for the web. The segment I will talk about in this post was called “A Look Into Neil Patel’s Brain: How He Does Content Marketing”

Neil was allocated an hour for this session, so everything he did was done very quickly. He went straight into his personal site via the Google Analytics platform. While sharing his screen, he toggled to reports on the Analytics home page.

Neil checked his stats on his blog posts. He reminded the audience that you should never check a blog posts’ stats until after it’s gained some form of traction. Usually, it requires 3-6 months before it really gathers traffic. After this time span, you can start to notice patterns in individual keyword searches that lead and direct viewers to your post.

Neil clicked through to the icons labeled Behaviour > Site Content > All Pages. As a beginner using Google Analytics, it was baffling to see how quickly he navigated the platform. You could tell he was intimately familiar with the tool.

After clicking All Pages, he was directed to a list of all of his site’s pages. He sorted them from highest to least views. From here, he stated that you can click on a post that you want to look into further and see its individual stats.

Once noting down his top ranking content pages, Neil proceeded to navigate over to Google Search Console (formerly Google Webmaster Tools.) This is the platform he uses to see individual terms and phrases people type when they are searching for a post. From the webmaster homepage he went to Search Traffic > Search Analytics > Pages.

You will again see your top pages. Select the top ranking page you want to analyze and select Queries, sort by Impressions. Once these are selected Webmaster Tools generates all of the keywords that the page is getting traffic for.

Keywords Are Key

It is here that Neil suggested an oddly simple, yet profoundly overlooked tactic. He selected all of the keywords that were driving traffic to an individual blog post and integrated them into his original posts’ content. He chose only the keywords that had the highest impressions and click through rate, to maximize chances of future searches leading to his post.

In copywriting and writing for anything online, it is well known that pages rank on Google for certain keywords. Google can effectively understand what your post is about when its crawlers see that your keyword is in particular on-page areas, like your title tag, headings, and alt text.

Some websites go overboard and include so many keywords in their content, that it becomes difficult to read and understand. This is called “keyword stuffing” and it will heavily impede your ability to rank well. Neil said that he was not suggesting keyword stuffing. He noted that you should only incorporate these new keywords if they make sense in the context of the existing content. You want your readers to experience the best content, not content filled with buzzwords.

Write Long Content

He also said that the best way to add new keywords to your existing content is by adding more content to the page or blog post itself. Most blog posts on the web range anywhere from between 300-1000 words. Neil said that a lesser known secret is that longer content ranks higher. It makes sense, that long, well researched, quality posts are ranked higher by Google.

Google wants to show readers the best possible answer to their question. So if you write long and applicable content, there is a good chance that you’ll rank higher. Neil said that the minimum word count for any blog post should be no less than 2000 words. He said in order to incorporate keywords and continually update your post, simply add additional paragraphs to your existing content, using the new keywords. This both extends your content and adds in keywords while avoiding keyword stuffing!

Neil stated that you have to continually update and rewrite parts of your content. What better way to do it than by using key terms that you know people are already using to search!

This method seems deceptively straight forward. Those of us who write for the web know that keywords are “key” but we seldom go back to our old posts to update them and revisit keywords.

Step By Step Content Marketing Recap

  1. Gain insight on your popular content pieces via Google Analytics
  2. See which pages drive the most traffic (older content, 6months+)
  3. Navigate to Google Webmaster Tools
  4. Revisit the pages you noted down in Analytics
  5. Look at their individual stats, most importantly, “queries”
  6. Sort keywords by impressions and click through rates
  7. Select them and input them into your original piece of content
  8. Expand your content pieces to over 2000 words with updated information and keywords.

Final Thoughts On The Summit

I think that Neil shared valuable and straightforward information that can dramatically improve traffic if done correctly. I am only focusing on this specific section of his summit because the amount of information covered during the summit was extensive.

If people gained anything from watching the live event, that this was one of the most important key takeaways. Neil gave a few additional tips in a live Q&A session to close the summit on the final day. In this session, he covered hundreds of guest questions.

A few additional, closing facts that really stood out to me were:

  • Neil translates a lot of his websites and blog posts into multiple different languages, so they not only rank in English, they rank globally.
  • Neil suggests posting a quality blog post every day to your website. If this seems excessive, you can start with once a week. He indicated that influential sites like HubSpot rank high because of the sheer amount of content their sites contain. They naturally drive traffic and interest because of how much content they have online.
  • He noted that it can be difficult to predict what content will get traffic and what will be neglected online. This is partially why he emphasizes the need to write on everything and come back to posts after 6 months, to see what has traffic and what doesn’t.

Neil Patel clearly knows the in’s and out’s of the best content writing and web optimization for content. I would highly recommend attending his future summits if you are looking to improve your marketing tactics, or simply gain new insight on the topic. If you want to learn more about content marketing, there are plenty of resources online. Don’t be afraid to get started!

An Undisputed Method to Grow Your Email List

Everyone is inundated with emails every single day. You get emails from clients, colleagues, superiors, friends and family members.

There are emails you read and let’s face it – there are emails you don’t read. Too many companies are barking for your attention and you don’t have attention to spare.

Marketers need to understand this. Even more importantly, we need to understand the very people we send email campaigns to so we can deliver information they want and desire. We need to understand their roles, lives and interests.

I contend that understanding your own email inbox habits are essential to understanding what makes for great email marketing.

If you think an email, maybe from a digest you subscribed to years ago is so repugnant that you wouldn’t want it showing up in your inbox, isn’t this something you should (re)consider sending out to your own contacts and clients? Would they want equally repulsive content?

I suppose it’s a classic case of “treat people the way you want to be treated” or “treat your list the way you want to be treated.”

A better question is: Do you know what they want and what they consider repulsive? Understanding who is on the other end of your email marketing initiatives is vital. They have needs, wants and interests and it’s up to you to serve them the right content.

In this blog post, I’ll talk about a method that few business owners or marketers employ in their email marketing campaigns: Serving content their audience actually wants to consume. I’ll also talk about the process to determine what that content can be.

A Tactic To Help You Understand Your Contacts

To properly understand what your contacts do and don’t want to consume, do a role reversal. What information would you NOT like to consume if it was sent to your inbox one week? What if it was sent to your inbox in consecutive weeks or months? How would you feel?

Now, think about this. What if a business you bought a product from, now with consent to send you emails, sent you an email with special promotions? Depending on a number of factors, you may like it or you may not.

Now, what if you received a similar email every single week advertising a particular sale at this business? How would you feel? If you’d be leaning towards that ‘Subscribe’ button, I’d like to welcome you to the ‘Rest of Us’ club.

This was just a basic exercise. There are methods of doing more formal exercises to properly understand the people you’re sending emails to.

Fully Understanding Your Contacts – Using Buyer Personas

The best way to understand your contacts while streamlining your marketing efforts is to understand your organization’s buyer personas.

Buyer personas are fictional representations of your ideal buyers. These are created based on qualitative data you’ve collected about your customers.

A business could have one buyer persona or several. It all depends on your business. A buyer persona is based off a person and not a business.

What I mean is that a business, let’s say an agency like us at ElementIQ – we are a B2B business. Our clients are businesses. However, the people we want to attract are decision-makers on digital marketing campaigns.

This could be:

  1. The owner of the company
  2. The marketing manager, in the case of a mid-size company

To create these personas, you’ll have to take several of your clients aside and ask them a set of questions. HubSpot has a nice list of buyer persona questions you can ask.

Since we’re talking about email marketing campaigns, it may be useful to ask more email-centric questions, like what they currently subscribe to and what their criterion are for deleting emails and unsubscribing from email lists.

The next step is taking the responses to the buyer persona questions and forming personas from them. HubSpot has some neat persona templates you can download to assist with this process.

Once you’ve created your personas, you’ll know more than enough about your ideal buyers to understand what interests and engages them. From this, you can determine the subject matter of what is in your emails.

Content Marketing + Email Marketing = Success

So much of successful email marketing depends on the content in the actual email and how it can help the reader.

If you bought tires from Michelin, would you need more tires the next week or the week after that? Unless, you are a poor driver, probably not.

However, what if Michelin sent you emails on how to take care of your tires so that they last longer? That might be pretty appetizing! That’s helpful information that could literally save you money down the road.

You might be thinking – “Why would Michelin do this? They’re pushing money away!”

It’s about the relationship they’re building with their customer. They know that helping the customer in some way will build a stronger bond through increased trust. This is a major benefit of investing in content marketing – and this can help your email campaigns succeed.

The Michelin Guide To Cars – Content Marketing At Its Finest

Michelin actually did this, way back in 1900. Andre and Edouard Michelin were saddled with a problem. More cars needed to be sold in order for more of their tires to be sold. So they published the Michelin Guide. It educated car owners on their cars. It talked about latest news and how to take better care of their cars.

More cars mean more tires. That means more money for Michelin. It worked.

The guide is still published today, over a century later.

As I’ve illustrated, it can be applied to email marketing too. The lesson is to provide the best possible information in whatever method of delivery – in this case, your emails.

An Example Of An Email Campaign Delivering Great Content

One email digest I subscribe to is Vega, a company that sells plant-based nutritional products. In my humble opinion, I think they do a fantastic job of providing great value in the form of information, discounts, and specials in their emails.

They give you a 15% off discount simply for subscribing to their list – a nice incentive. Their emails are filled with recipes, how-to information, and more.

They often use themes. Here’s an ice-cream-themed email:

This one is full of recipes. I’ve received other emails where they’ll have recipes and near the end of the email is a call-to-action for buying ingredients for that recipe in their store.

One email for National Smoothie Day entails a section of the email to purchase smoothie supplies, followed by consecutive sections containing a Raspberry Biscotti Smoothie recipe, the 7 Day Smoothie Challenge and a blog post on How to Build the Best Smoothie.

The folks at Vega have identified who their buyer personas are and what their ideal buyers like. They know that their subscriber base cares about health – otherwise, why would they be interested in a company selling plant-based products? They include in plant-based recipes that have nothing to do with their brand, recipes that could include a Vega product and other pieces of relevant, valuable health information.

Also note the layout of their emails, as depicted in the above screenshot. It’s picture, text and call-to-action. Always in that order. The layout is simple and clean – how marketing emails ought to look.

How We Layout Content In Our Email Marketing Campaigns

At ElementIQ, we use a very similar approach to Vega, with respect to content. We go through a process to understand and create buyer personas for the business we’re working on. We want to understand their subscriber list so we know what content they’ll want to consume. This means the agency you’re working with must have not only email marketing experts but content marketing experts.

For each email, there are 3 components:

  1. About the Business. This section is some piece of relevant, new information about the business. Could be an open house, something your business is doing in the community or what your office is like.
  2. Evergreen Content. You’ll need to understand the term ‘evergreen’ – it’s a piece of content that is not time-relevant. It could be useful to the reader at any point in time. This section would include a link to an evergreen blog post on your website, for example.
  3. An Offer. There must always be a call-to-action in every email. Give them an action to take and make it enticing. This can be a sale or discount, for example.

Vega’s emails are more like this:

  1. The Evergreen Content #1
  2. Evergreen Content #2
  3. Evergreen Content #3
  4. Offer

Again, how you structure your emails does depend on what your list looks like and what they want to hear. For the average local small business, their customers are local and are interested in local activities. So the structure we’ve set out above would work for them.

However, a larger company, like Vega, may want more evergreen pieces because their ultimate goal is to educate and inform (while still selling in a very subtle manner).

Reviewing The ‘Undisputed Method’

I’ve given you a lot of information here and there’s quite a bit of work for you to do.

To summarize, you’ll need to:

  1. Survey your clients with a buyer persona questionnaire.
  2. Create buyer personas.
  3. Identify what kinds of content and the topics each persona would be interested in and engaged by.
  4. Plan out your emails to have a balance of information that your buyer personas would actually be excited to read.
  5. Send away!

If you’ve got any questions, don’t hesitate to leave a comment below and I’ll reply to you as soon as possible.